me@you.com

me@you.com - K.E. Payne I can appreciate a story like "me@you.com" for the way it shows a young, college aged woman coming to terms with her sexuality and ultimately finding a relationship that makes her happy. Imogen (Immy) Summers seems to have a good life surrounding her in the beginning, but is ultimately unfulfilled by it. She has an attentive, steady boyfriend (Matt), attends uni, gushes with fans of a popular TV show featuring a mainstay lesbian couple that she's fascinated by and frequents chatting online with various colorful personalities. But the fact remains that she's looking for something more, and she learns, progressively, that the nature of her relationships have to change in order for her to feel complete.To be fair, I think the beginning of this book is a little difficult to slug through because the progression of Immy's "coming out" is a bit haphazard. Granted, it's supposed to be awkward - I understood that completely, but I think the presentation of that could've been handled a little better in the writing. I appreciate KE Payne's keen focus to Immy's stumbling blocks and making her a flawed heroine, though. Immy's not the most endearing character at first - she makes a lot of key (and common) relationship mistakes, but I think in some considerations, this make her more realistic. On others, I think more time could've been spent on getting to how she transitions/embraces her sexuality. Also, I think it would've been interesting/noteworthy to see how Immy's family took her sexuality, though I appreciated the range of sentiments that were noted in how others (Immy's friends) perceived her "coming out."The book gets much better when it actually comes to Immy trying to form her relationships, and realizing the heartache, betrayal, and ultimately the coming to terms with her sentiments in those relationships. I found the bonds built and the interactions between the characters charming and engaging for the most part. I could feel Immy's range of emotions and her sentiments of love are genuine, as much as her heartache. I did wish it could've been a bit more intimate with the emotions in some places, but I still understood the conviction behind many of Immy's experiences and reactions. The thing that I think young adults will gain from reading this book is realizing that it's okay to embrace who you are as a person and to feel comfortable finding the one your heart aligns to. It may take a bit of time getting there, but ultimately finding the one you want to be with is a process, a journey of two that may have its ups and downs, but is worth the time exploring to get there.Overall score: 3.5/5Note: I received this as an ARC from NetGalley, from the publisher Bold Strokes Books.